Tag Archives: holiday tips

HOLIDAY TIP | Have a Back-up Plan

ESCAPE PLAN  IN PLACE

Escape-PlanThe holiday season abounds with new sounds, unfamiliar faces and different schedules and if you don’t yet have a plan in place for your child, there’s still time.

When it all becomes too much—too many people, too much noise, too much that’s unknown—having a ‘plan of escape’ to a place to self-regulate is always wise. With one or two back-up plans, at least you have options. Practice a non-verbal hand signal your kid can give you to show you he needs to leave, instead of shouting at the top of his lungs, “It’s time for everyone to go home now! We’re done!”

Often, just knowing that it’s okay to escape to a quiet place is enough.

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Aside

It’s 1 Day to Christmas It’s Christmas Eve and the children are nestled all snug in their beds; take this time to exhale and relax your tired head.   Dec. 24            Day 12   Christmas Eve.   … Continue reading

Holiday Tip #11 for Parents of Children with Autism

It’s 2 days to Christmas, the excitement is building,
gifts are under the tree and the stockings are bursting.
 
Dec. 23            Day 11   Establish Family Traditions.
 
Traditions are a big part of holiday celebrations. Make your traditions as unique as your family. Same time every year, we gather to watch the 1951 version of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. That’s just one of the ways we provide a routine in our household during this busy, bustling season. Be sure to allow plenty of quiet, together time, too.
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HAPPY CHRISTMAS EVE EVE!

 

Holiday Tip #10 for Parents of Children with Autism

It’s 3 days to Christmas and the kids are getting antsy. “Outside to play now!” and no one dresses fancy.
Dec. 22            Day 10   Sensory Overload.
The sights, sounds, smells and activities of Christmas are comforting to some, and menacing to others. Be mindful of that as you enter different environments. To help regulate all this, make exercise part of your daily schedule. Nothing is more cleansing. A family hike, bike ride or jog each day in warmer climes—sledding, skiing or making a snowman, in colder climes—will do wonders to help keep things in balance.
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IT’S BEGINNING TO LOOK A LOT LIKE CHRISTMAS!
 
As the mother of a son with autism, I’ve committed myself over the years to learning, understanding and sharing the most effective ways to nurture, protect and prepare a child with autism. Strategies with the potential to reap great rewards for our kids. Strategies for the holiday season and beyond, which I’ll gladly share with you.
And right now I’m offering speaking engagements to parent groups, educators, autism support groups, government agencies and community organizations. 

Reserve your booking by calling 714-501-8735.
The talk is free. The information is priceless.

Holiday Tip #8 for Parent of Children with Autism

It’s 5 days to Christmas and we all play a part. When our kids can

contribute, they have happy hearts!

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Kids don’t care to sit and chat forever–but during the meal, try to draw them into the conversation by bringing up a favorite topic of theirs. Or ask about a special holiday memory. It can be fun for everyone!

Dec. 20            Day 8   Full Inclusion—after all, it’s Christmas.

Be sure to include your child in the discussion at the holiday dinner table. An easy way to do this is to bring up one of his or her favorite topicsallowing your child to chime in. Another way is to go around the table and ask for each person’s favorite Christmas memory or whatever. Of course, let your child know you’re going to do this in advance—so he can mentally prepare.

LET THE SLEIGH BELLS JINGLE!

Holiday Tip #7 for Parents of Children with Autism

It’s 6 days to Christmas and there are special holiday foods. My son’s
GFCF favorites are always on the menu, keeping him in a joyful mood!
Dec. 19            Day 7   Choice—after all, it’s Christmas.
Let your child decide what he wants to eat for the Christmas meal.
Traditionally, we have a Christmas Brunch but my son can’t eat
the main course because it’s not GFCF. So I let him write his
own menu [which is a great skill!]. Take it a step further and
have him help you shop for his special meal. It’s worth taking
the extra time because all this can help reduce mealtime stress
and anxiety during the holidays.
HO! HO! HO!
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Holiday Tips #3 & 4 for Parents of Children with Autism

ARM went dark for one day to honor the memories of all those who died in Newtown, CT.
 
It’s 9 days to Christmas and what do I fear? Crowds, chaos and commotion, that much is clear.
Dec. 15            Day 10   Watch What You Eat
We know that nutrition affects behavior. And we all have a tendency
to snack too much on sweets and bad foods during holidays. So be
sure to have healthy snacks on hand—carrots/celery sticks, nuts,
raisins, fresh fruit, yogurt, string cheese. In our GFCFSF household,
I do lots of baking ahead of time, so we have muffins, cookies
and quickbreads in the freezer. My “trick” with breads and
muffins is that I load them with sweet potato puree or
bananas or carrots or squash — instead of sugar — to make
them healthier.
 
Dec. 16            Day 9   Buy My Book
A few years ago my son and I wrote a book of tips for teachers.
“Teaching My Teacher About Autism” is a great gift idea for teachers and other professionals
 
As the mother of a son with autism, I’ve committed myself over the years to learning, understanding and sharing the most effective ways to nurture, protect and prepare a child with autism. Strategies with the potential to reap great rewards for our kids.
Strategies for the holiday season and beyond, which I’ll gladly share with you.
 
And right now I’m offering a one-hour consultation–free of charge. 
Call 714-501-8735. The consult is free. The information is priceless.
 
Deck the Halls!

 

 

Holiday Tip #1 for Parents of Children with Autism

It’s 12 Days to Christmas

It’s 12 days to Christmas in our autistic household, and we’ve got some helpful tips to carry you peacefully through the days of anticipatory anxiety and stress. Let’s count down, shall we?

Dec. 13            Day 12            

Maintain structure for best results during the holidays.

Keep in mind that, during these hectic holiday times, that mixing activities with downtime on a predetermined schedule helps ease the strain on individuals with autism.

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It’s important to build in relaxation time during the hectic holidays.

As the mother of a son with autism, I’ve committed myself over the years to learning, understanding and sharing the most effective ways to nurture, protect and prepare a child with autism. Strategies with the potential to reap great rewards for our kids. Strategies for the holiday season and beyond, which I’ll gladly share with you.

And right now I’m offering speaking engagements to parent groups, educators, autism support groups, government agencies and community organizations. 

Reserve your booking by calling 714-501-8735. The talk is free. The information is priceless.
 
Enjoy your ho-ho-holiday season!