Tag Archives: transition tips

Preparing Your Child for Independent Life After High School | SKILL #3: Teach Your Child Basic Food Prep

INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS
 
With graduation season just a few months away, we are reminded of the importance of transition to independent adult life. I realize those can be scary words—at least to us parents and caregivers. Nonetheless, we need to give our kids the skills necessary so they can succeed.
 
Here we continue our focus on transitions with this third installment of ways to prepare your child for life after high school. Sure, I know as well as you do, that many times it’s quicker and less messy if we just ‘do it for them.’ But a young, independent adult should know how to prepare or cook two or three breakfast, lunch and dinner items for him/herself.
 
SKILL #3:   Teach your child basic food preparation.
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For example:
  • Wash hands first!
  • Use knives and kitchen appliances safely
  • Use a stove, microwave and oven safely
    • Don’t put metal items in microwave.
    • Know how to preheat oven, use potholders and timer and turn off the oven when done. 
    • Be careful with gas/electric stove tops. 
  • Follow proper food handling procedures
    • Refrigerate foods needing refrigeration.
    • Wash fruits and veggies prior to eating.
    • Be aware of expiration dates and toss expired items.
  • Clean up
    • Store food in covered containers, throw out any trash and always wipe down the work surface. 
    • Scrape and rinse the dishes/utensils and either wash them or put them in the dishwasher.
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Start with meals that don’t require cooking. A breakfast with fruit, cereal with milk, yogurt and juice, for example. When those skills are mastered, move on to cooking one breakfast meal. Then cooking one meal for lunch. Then dinner. Repeat the process to become proficient with several different items for each meal. Bon appétit! 
 
As the mother of a son with autism, I’ve committed myself over the years to learning, understanding and sharing the most effective ways to nurture, protect and prepare a child with autism. Strategies with the potential to reap great rewards for our kids. Strategies for transitions and more, which I’ll
gladly share with you. 
 
Contact me at 714-501-8735 or debora@autismresourcemom.com
 
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Preparing Your Child for Life After High School | SKILL #1

INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS
 
With graduation season soon to be upon us, it brings to mind the importance of transitions. Thank goodness my son still has a couple of years to go—that’s lucky for us. All the more time to prepare.
 
To make the move from high school to college or the workplace as seamless as possible, of course proper planning has to occur. I’ve learned a lot from the various workshops and trainings I’ve attended, and would like to share some strategies with you here.
 
Over the next 15 weeks, I’ll send out 10 ways you can help prepare your child for this next phase in his/her life. Remember, it’s never too early or too late to prepare our kids for life after high school. But, the earlier we start, the better.
 
When do you think transition prep should begin? Gold stars to all you who answered “From day one.” Yes, from the moment you put your child in someone else’s care, you start preparing that child for transitions throughout his/her life.
 
So all you parents with kids in elementary school, pay close attention. And all you parents with kids in middle school, incorporate these into your child’s lifeAnd all you parents with kids in high school, practice these daily with your teen!
 
Good luck!
“Planning is bringing the future into the present so that you can do something about it now.” —Alan Lakein
 
SKILL #1:   Teach your child to wake to an alarm.     Image
It’s one of the fundamentals of independent living. When an individual can get himself up in the morning
without relying on someone to wake him, he’s on the right track. It doesn’t happen overnight, so be patient.
 
Some tips:
 
  • Put the alarm clock away from the child’s bed so that he has to physically get up to turn it off. This will help keep him from going back to sleep after he turns it off.
  • Paint the alarm button with day-glo paint or put a neon sticker on it, so the child can easily identify it.
  • Reward your child when he doesn’t use the snooze button or go back to bed. 
 
As the mother of a son with autism, I’ve committed myself over the years to learning, understanding and sharing the most effective ways to nurture, protect and prepare a child with autism. Strategies with the potential to reap great rewards for our kids. Strategies for transitions and more, which I’ll gladly share with you.
 
And right now I’m offering speaking engagements to parent groups, educators, autism support groups, government agencies and community organizations. 
 
Reserve your booking by calling 714-501-8735. The talk is free. The information is priceless.
Remember to set the alarm!